Dr. Fred Koslowsky - 403.234.7400

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Post-Treatment Instructions

Post-Operative Instructions after Fillings & Crowns Post-Treatment Instructions:

1. Do not chew or suck on a numb cheek, tongue or lip – injury and/or infection may result.

2. Do not eat while still numb. Drink liquids with caution and avoid hot liquids to prevent burns.

3. Typically the freezing may last for several hours. Length of time varies with individuals.

4. Transient jaw joint discomfort may occur when the mouth has been kept open. If discomfort has occurred reduce jaw activities such as heavy chewing, excess talking, gum chewing, etc.

5. Most discomfort will occur in the first 24 to 48 hours as the body heals following treatment. It is recommended that an anti-inflammatory such as Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) be taken as needed for the first 2 days. If you are unable to take Ibuprofen, Tylenol Extra-strength may be substituted as a suitable pain-killer. Call our office with any concerns.

6. Take all medications exactly as prescribed even if pain or swelling has subsided.

7. Attend all post-operative follow-up appointments as recommended.

Restorations (Direct and Indirect fillings or Crowns):

1. Slight sensitivity to cold, hot or biting is normal for a few days following the placement of a new restoration. Teeth that had deep decay or large restorations placed including crowns may require several weeks to settle down. If discomfort persists or if you have any concerns call our office.

2. It is normal for new restorations to require slight adjustments regarding bite. If you feel you need an adjustment “because the teeth do not fit together quite right”, do not hesitate to call our office. Symptoms can include sensitivity to biting or chewing, especially when chewing hard foods. Call our office to schedule an adjustment as delay could damage the new restoration and lead to greater symptoms or problems. We normally do not charge a fee to adjust newly placed restorations.

3. Following the placement of a new restoration, small bits of resin tooth cement or material may still be present between the teeth that were restored and may be removed by flossing. Most restorations will have very small ledges or areas where the floss may catch slightly. If you experience persistent problems, call our office.

4. If pain or swelling occurs following the placement of a new restoration, the tooth may require further treatment and/or antibiotics my be required to control the symptoms. If you have any concerns call our office.

5. The gums may be sore following your appointment for several days. Rinse 3X per day with warm salt water to reduce discomfort and swelling as necessary.

6. Most restorations will fail if not maintained properly. Regular brushing, flossing and check-ups are essential to maintain your restorations.

Temporary Fillings or Crowns

1. Some procedures may require the placement of a temporary filling or crown. If a temporary restoration is used between appointments, it’s common (and not a problem) for a small portion of your temporary filling to wear away or break off. If the entire filling falls out or if a temporary crown comes off, call us so that it can be replaced. It is very important for the fit of your final restoration that temporaries stay in place. Avoid sticky foods which can dislodge the temporary and try to chew on the opposite side of your mouth if possible. Brush the area gently but do not floss around the temporary filling (if present) as this may dislodge it.

· Call our office at 403-234-7400 if you have any concerns.

* Click HERE to download instructions as a PDF for printing. 

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Post-Operative Instructions After Gum Surgery

Please note: These instructions are for the benefit of the dental patients treated by our office. Patients being treated by other dentists may receive the same instructions or instructions that have been modified based upon the individual care they have received. Should you be experiencing either unusual pain or swelling or both please call your dentist immediately!

1. Bleeding is to be expected following surgical procedures. The gauze that has been placed in your mouth before you left the office should remain in position for at least 45 minutes. At the end of the 45 minutes, please take two or three pieces of gauze, fold in half and if needed fold again and replace the gauze that is in your mouth and continue biting very firm on the gauze for another 45 minutes - total time biting on gauze is approximately 1 ˝ hours. Should the bleeding continue after this, repeat the process, placing gauze for another 45 minutes. Should there continue to be excessive bleeding do as follows: Wipe off excessively large blood clots with gauze. Place folded gauze over the bleeding area. Bite firmly on pad and maintain gentle pressure for 45 minutes. Some oozing of blood over the next few days is normal. Contact the office or go to the emergency room at the hospital if excessive bleeding persists.

2. Pain. Some discomfort is normal following surgery. The site of the surgery as well as the jaw joints may be stiff and sore for as little as a few days or for as long as a couple of weeks. Please take two aspirin or Tylenol™ or Advil™ or other over-the-counter analgesic as soon as you arrive at home. Continue to take the analgesic every three to four hours at least for the first 24 to 48 hours to minimize any discomfort. If you have been given a prescription for pain medication, please take as directed (Do not drive, work with machinery, or drink alcoholic beverages for at least 6 hours after taking any prescribed pain medication). Some pain medications may make you nauseous and should be discontinued if this takes place. If you have a reaction to the medication, stop the medication and call the office immediately.

3. Antibiotics. If antibiotics are prescribed to reduce infection and swelling, take as directed. Be sure to take all the tablets prescribed. If any reactions occur, such as a rash or itching, discontinue all medication immediately and call the office. Antibiotics may take a day or two to be effective so continue to use pain medication as required.

4. Rinsing. On the first day following surgery, do not rinse your mouth, do not spit and do not use mouthwash, as any of these will lead to a possible loss of the blood clot that protects the healing extraction site and will then lead to pain. After the first day of surgery, gently rinse with warm salt water (one teaspoon in glass of warm water) for 20-30 seconds before spitting it out, ten (10) times per day over the next 5-7 days. Do not rinse too vigorously until healing has taken place.

5. Brushing/Flossing. Avoid brushing and flossing the area of surgery to avoid disturbing or dislodging the sutures or gum flap for a period of at least 2 weeks; after 2 weeks you can brush gently (no scrubbing). Do not use floss, or toothpicks or anything else to clean in between the teeth for 6 weeks after your surgery date. Brush and floss all other areas of your mouth.

6. Swelling. Following surgery some swelling is expected. It will reach its peak on the second day following surgery and it will begin to resolve on the fourth day. To minimize swelling, apply a covered (with towel) ice bag to your face for 10-minute intervals, removing the bag for 20 minutes in between intervals to avoid frost-bite. Continue ice packs for 4-6 hours after surgery.

7. Temperature. Following surgery it is quite common to have a slight elevation in temperature. Rest, take 2 aspirin or Tylenol™ or other over-the-counter analgesic every 4-6 hours, and drink plenty of fluids will return temperature to normal. If you are taking prescribed pain medication, they will also aid in controlling fever and additional aspirin or Tylenol™ or other over-the-counter analgesic will not have to be taken.

8. Eating. A well balanced diet is important for proper healing. A soft, bland diet is suggested for the first few days. Drink plenty of fluids as soon as possible (do not use a straw), especially if you have been given antibiotics. Avoid hot foods, hot liquid and avoid smoking for at least 48 to 60 hours after surgery. (Smoking will delay the healing process and will reduce the chance of a successful outcome) Do not chew on a numb or “frozen” lip as injury can result.

9. The following conditions may occur, all of which are considered normal: Swelling and bruising can be expected. Minimize by using ice packs. Slight to moderate pain can be expected. Do not wait until the pain is severe to take medication. Have the prescription filled and take the first dose at once. Trismus (tightness) of the muscles may cause difficulty in opening the mouth. Should this happen, apply moist heat to the area. A sore throat may also develop. The corners of your mouth may dry and crack. Keep moist with ointment or petroleum jelly.

10. Sensitivity to cold, hot or biting is normal following a gum surgery appointment. Some tooth mobility might be normal following treatment. Once the gums heal, teeth will reach their normal degree of mobility.

11. Sutures and Dressing. Silk or permanent sutures are used most often. Sutures are usually removed 3-4 weeks following surgery. If a dressing is placed avoid chewing on that area. The dressing may chip apart during the week which is normal. If any questions please call our office.

12. Keep all post-surgical appointments, usually one week apart for 3 - 4 weeks, and follow-ups to ensure a successful outcome of your procedure. The majority of the healing normally takes place over an 8-12 week period; remaining tissue changes and healing take place over a period of one year.

13. Treatment of gum infection involves removing calculus and plaque, the sources of infection, and allowing periodontal pockets to heal. Infection may get worse in cases where disease was present prior to treatment. Contact our office if you have any concerns.

14. Regular maintenance is essential to maintain healthy gums once all the calculus has been removed, signs of bleeding gums have been eliminated and pocket depths are measured as normal.

15. Recall maintenance appointments (check-ups) are recommended every 3-6 months depending on your ability to maintain a healthy and clean mouth. More frequent appointments may be recommended for certain situations. These appointments are imperative to the success of the procedure. If you have any concerns or problems contact our office at 403-234-7400 so the problem can be addressed. If the office is closed go to the emergency room at the hospital. Contact our office as soon as possible.

* Click HERE to download instructions as a PDF for printing.

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Post-Operative Instructions After Root Canal Post-Treatment Instructions:

1. Do not chew or suck on a numb cheek, tongue or lip – injury and/or infection may result.

2. Do not eat while still numb. Drink liquids with caution and avoid hot liquids to prevent burns.

3. Typically the freezing may last for several hours. Length of time varies with individuals.

4. Transient jaw joint discomfort may occur when the mouth has been kept open. If discomfort has occurred reduce jaw activities such as heavy chewing, excess talking, gum chewing, etc.

5. Most discomfort will occur in the first 24 to 48 hours as the body heals following treatment. It is recommended that an anti-inflammatory such as Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) be taken as needed for the first 2 days. If you are unable to take Ibuprofen, Tylenol Extra-strength may be substituted as a suitable pain-killer. Call our office with any concerns.

6. Take all medications exactly as prescribed even if pain or swelling has subsided.

7. Attend all post-operative follow-up appointments as recommended. Root-canal Treatment

8. If you have had root-canal treatment it is normal that the tooth may experience slight to moderate discomfort for a few days following treatment. The tooth may not feel perfectly normal with some chewing sensitivity for several weeks. If pain or swelling occurs we may prescribe medications. Call our office with any concerns.

9. Some root canals take several appointments to complete. If a temporary restoration is used between appointments, it’s common (and not a problem) for a small portion of your temporary filling to wear away or break off. If the entire filling falls out or if a temporary crown comes off, call us so that it can be replaced. Avoid sticky foods which can dislodge the temporary and try to chew on the opposite side of your mouth if possible.

10. Crowns are usually recommended following root canal as a final restoration to prevent tooth fracture and premature tooth loss.

11.The gums may be sore following your appointment for several days. Rinse 3X per day with warm salt water to reduce discomfort and swelling if necessary.

12. Brush the area gently but do not floss around the temporary filling (if present) as this may dislodge it.

13. Most restorations will fail if not maintained properly. Regular brushing, flossing and check-ups are essential to maintain your restorations. · Call our office at 403-234-7400 if you have any concerns

* Click HERE to download instructions as a PDF for printing.

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Post-Operative Instructions After Scaling Post-Treatment Instructions:

1. Do not chew or suck on a numb cheek, tongue or lip – injury and/or infection may result.

2. Do not eat while still numb. Drink liquids with caution and avoid hot liquids to prevent burns.

3. Typically the freezing may last for several hours. Length of time varies with individuals.

4. Transient jaw joint discomfort may occur when the mouth has been kept open. If discomfort has occurred reduce jaw activities such as heavy chewing, excess talking, gum chewing, etc.

5. Most discomfort will occur in the first 24 to 48 hours as the body heals following treatment. It is recommended that an anti-inflammatory such as Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) be taken as needed for the first 2 days. If you are unable to take Ibuprofen, Tylenol Extra-strength may be substituted as a suitable pain-killer. Call our office with any concerns.

6. Take all medications exactly as prescribed even if pain or swelling has subsided.

7. Attend all post-operative follow-up appointments as recommended. Scaling treatment

8. You may experience slight tooth or gum discomfort following a scaling appointment. Use your regular pain-killer as necessary. Brush and floss gently. Rinse 3X per day with warm salt water to reduce discomfort and swelling if necessary.

9. Slight sensitivity to cold, hot or biting is normal following a scaling appointment.

10. Some tooth mobility might be normal following treatment in areas of excess calculus build-up. Once the gums heal, teeth will reach their normal degree of mobility.

11. The treatment of gum infection involves removing calculus and plaque, the sources of infection, and allowing periodontal pockets to heal. Infection may get worse in cases where disease was present prior to treatment. If pain or swelling occurs following a scaling appointment we may prescribe medications.

12. Some patients require several appointments to treat cases of moderate to severe calculus build-up. If bleeding gums or persistent “pockets” remain following initial therapy, surgical treatment or referral to a specialist may be recommended.

13. Regular maintenance is essential to maintain healthy gums once all the calculus has been removed, signs of bleeding gums have been eliminated and pocket depths are measured as normal.

14. Recall maintenance appointments (check-ups) are recommended every 3-6 months depending on your ability to maintain a healthy and clean mouth.

15. Most restorations will fail if not maintained properly. Regular brushing, flossing and check-ups are essential to maintain your restorations.

· Call our office at 403-234-7400 if you have any concerns.

* Click HERE to download instructions as a PDF for printing.

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Post-Operative Instructions After Tooth Removal

Please note: These instructions are for the benefit of the dental patients treated by our office. Patients being treated by other dentists may receive the same instructions or instructions that have been modified based upon the individual care they have received. Should you be experiencing either unusual pain or swelling or both, please call your dentist immediately!

1. Bleeding is to be expected following extractions and other surgical procedures. The gauze that has been placed in your mouth before you left the office should remain in position for at least 45 minutes. At the end of the 45 minutes, please take two or three pieces of gauze, fold in half and if needed fold again and replace the gauze that is in your mouth and continue biting very firm on the gauze for another 45 minutes - total time biting on gauze is approximately 1 ˝ hours. Should the bleeding continue after this, repeat the process, placing gauze for another 45 minutes. Should there continue to be excessive bleeding do as follows: Wipe off excessively large blood clots with gauze. Place folded gauze over the bleeding area. Bite firmly on pad and maintain gentle pressure for 45 minutes. Some oozing of blood over the next few days is normal. Contact the office or go to the emergency room at the hospital if excessive bleeding persists.

2. Pain. Some discomfort is normal following surgery. The site of the extraction as well as the jaw joints may be stiff and sore for as little as a few days or for as long as a couple of weeks. Please take two aspirin or Tylenol™ or Advil™ or other over-the-counter analgesic as soon as you arrive at home. Continue to take the analgesic every three to four hours at least for the first 24 to 48 hours to minimize any discomfort. If you have been given a prescription for pain medication, please take as directed (Do not drive, work with machinery, or drink alcoholic beverages for at least 6 hours after taking any prescribed pain medication). Some pain medications may make you nauseous and should be discontinued if this takes place. If you have a reaction to the medication, stop the medication and call the office immediately.

3. Antibiotics. If antibiotics are prescribed to reduce infection and swelling, take as directed. Be sure to take all the tablets prescribed. If any reactions occur, such as a rash or itching, discontinue all medication immediately and call the office. Antibiotics may take a day or two to be effective so continue to use pain medication as required.

4. Rinsing. On the first day following surgery, do not rinse your mouth, do not spit and do not use mouthwash, as any of these will lead to a possible loss of the blood clot that protects the healing extraction site and will then lead to pain. After the first day of surgery, gently rinse with warm salt water (one teaspoon in glass of warm water) for 20-30 seconds before spitting it out, ten (10) times per day over the next 5-7 days. Do not rinse too vigorously until healing has taken place.

5. Swelling. Following surgery some swelling is expected. It will reach its peak on the second day following surgery and it will begin to resolve on the fourth day. To minimize swelling, apply a covered (with towel) ice bag to your face for 10-minute intervals, removing the bag for 20 minutes in between intervals to avoid frost-bite. Continue ice packs for 4-6 hours after surgery.

6. Temperature. Following surgery it is quite common to have a slight elevation in temperature. Rest, take 2 aspirin or Tylenol™ or other over-the-counter analgesic every 4-6 hours, and drink plenty of fluids will return temperature to normal. If you are taking prescribed pain medication, they will also aid in controlling fever and additional aspirin or Tylenol™ or other over-the-counter analgesic will not have to be taken.

7. Eating. A well balanced diet is important for proper healing. A soft, bland diet is suggested for the first few days. Drink plenty of fluids as soon as possible (do not use a straw), especially if you have been given antibiotics. Avoid hot foods, hot liquid and avoid smoking for at least 48 to 60 hours after surgery. (Smoking will delay the healing process and is a major cause of “dry socket”.) Do not chew on a numb or “frozen” lip as injury can result.

8. Impacted or Surgically removed teeth. The following conditions may occur, all of which are considered normal: Swelling and bruising can be expected. Minimize by using ice packs. Moderate to severe pain can be expected. Do not wait until the pain is severe to take medication. Have the prescription filled and take the first dose at once. Trismus (tightness) of the muscles may cause difficulty in opening the mouth. Should this happen, apply moist heat to the area. A sore throat may also develop. The corners of your mouth may dry and crack. Keep moist with ointment or petroleum jelly.

9. Sutures. Self-dissolving sutures are used most often. Over the next few days they will slowly dissolve and/or begin to loosen and eventually disappear. If permanent sutures are used you should return to the office in one to two weeks to have them removed.

Dry Socket

A dry socket can occur after a tooth has been extracted where the blood clot fails to form or disintegrates without undergoing organization. It can be accompanied by neuralgic pain with or without suppuration (infection / pus). A dry socket can be due to the body’s inability to form a stable blood clot but usually occurs as a result of too much rinsing or "spitting" and thus the blood clot is dislodged or never really forms. The blood clot acts as a bandage over the recent extraction site. Symptoms can include a constant throbbing over several days – the pain can be quite severe and "doesn't seem to go away". If you think that you have a dry socket your dentist should be contacted. Pain medication and sometimes antibiotics will be prescribed to minimize the discomfort. A day or two may be required before some relief is felt and may take several weeks to heal. Normal healing is indicated by a decrease in need for pain medication over a period of time.

Removal of Teeth

After the tooth has been pulled there may be tenderness in the area where the tooth was. This is normal, having a tooth pulled is a form of surgery, and any area would be tender after such a procedure. Please speak with your dentist, he or she can answer any questions you may have and help make you more comfortable. If you have any concerns or problems contact our office at 403-234-7400 so the problem can be addressed. If the office is closed go to the emergency room at the hospital. Contact our office as soon as possible.

* Click HERE to download instructions as a PDF for printing.

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